I’ve been thrilled at the interest shown in the Epizoescope at steampunk events. People are drawn to the fascinating moving mechanism and how it seems to create animated images. Perfect for placing in a shop window or on a shop counter to attract customers. The secretly enclosed digital picture frame will automatically play all the compatible video and image files it finds on the inserted pen drive or SD card. You can create all sorts of advertising media, from still images of your products, to a blockbuster video advertising your shop! Compatible image and video files are played in order from the available media. It is 56cm wide by 53cm high by 29cm deep. Everything runs off a single plug in power supply which is included. There’s a flickering ‘lime light’ display on the side with simulated oxygen and hydrogen controls - the only way Victorians could create an intense light source. Needing a way of displaying the Prognosticator 2 steampunk weather station at the Whitby steampunk event, I purchased a digital photo frame. It’s appearance was very boring, it looked like every other digital display around today. I started by making a support into which the photo frame fitted. Having done that, I realised that Victorian optical devices invariably had bellows. A quick look online and sure enough instructions on how to make bellows followed. It then needed a back onto which to fit the bellows. Then, needless to say, I spent several wonderful days adding all the other moving mechanical bits including a mechanical governor and a Nipkow disk - an early method of scanning images. I always try and bring some sort of historical realism into all of my inventions.
Luminescent Epizoescope
The Luminescent Epizoescope is named for the fact it manipulates an intense source of light to project a viewable moving image onto a screen, the content of which is a reflection of life, or something like that. It also sounds fabulous!
The Epizoescope moving picture machine and sound horn The Epizoescope moving picture machine and sound horn A view of the side of the Epizoescope showing the flickering candle A view of the side of the Epizoescope showing the flickering candle The side of the Epizoescope showing the limelight controls and bellows The side of the Epizoescope showing the limelight controls and bellows The Epizoescope's horn and mechanical parts The Epizoescope's horn and mechanical parts
Luminescent Epizoescope
The Luminescent Epizoescope is named for the fact it manipulates an intense source of light to project a viewable moving image onto a screen, the content of which is a reflection of life, or something like that. It also sounds fabulous!
I’ve been thrilled at the interest shown in the Epizoescope at steampunk events. People are drawn to the fascinating moving mechanism and how it seems to create animated images. Perfect for placing in a shop window or on a shop counter to attract customers. The secretly enclosed digital picture frame will automatically play all the compatible video and image files it finds on the inserted pen drive or SD card. You can create all sorts of advertising media, from still images of your products, to a blockbuster video advertising your shop! Compatible image and video files are played in order from the available media. It is 56cm wide by 53cm high by 29cm deep. Everything runs off a single plug in power supply which is included. There’s a flickering ‘lime light’ display on the side with simulated oxygen and hydrogen controls - the only way Victorians could create an intense light source. Needing a way of displaying the Prognosticator 2 steampunk weather station at the Whitby steampunk event, I purchased a digital photo frame. It’s appearance was very boring, it looked like every other digital display around today. I started by making a support into which the photo frame fitted. Having done that, I realised that Victorian optical devices invariably had bellows. A quick look online and sure enough instructions on how to make bellows followed. It then needed a back onto which to fit the bellows. Then, needless to say, I spent several wonderful days adding all the other moving mechanical bits including a mechanical governor and a Nipkow disk - an early method of scanning images. I always try and bring some sort of historical realism into all of my inventions.
The Epizoescope moving picture machine and sound horn The Epizoescope moving picture machine and sound horn A view of the side of the Epizoescope showing the flickering candle A view of the side of the Epizoescope showing the flickering candle The side of the Epizoescope showing the limelight controls and bellows The side of the Epizoescope showing the limelight controls and bellows The Epizoescope's moving mechanical parts. The Epizoescope's moving mechanical parts. The Epizoescope's horn and mechanical parts The Epizoescope's horn and mechanical parts