The Reciprocating Chronometer Kit
This is one of my favourite inventions, as it turns the really simple and mundane task of telling the time on its head! Why have a boring circular clock when you can impress your friends and amaze your enemies with a Reciprocating Chronometer? As with all true steampunk machines, the Reciprocating Chronometer is over- complicated, employing several intriguing mechanisms to display the time on an hour dial that doesn’t go all the way around, with AM and PM being mechanically displayed through a lens. It has a beautiful polished wooden base, a brass (coloured) body and mechanisms, clear laser engraved legends, a brass chain, counterweights and even a lens and spirit level! Don’t have any doubts regarding your ability to assemble it, as it’s designed to be straightforward to put together. I’ve broken down construction into a series of easy to follow video instructions - check them out below. Alternatively they are available fully assembled. ● The Reciprocating Chronometer is 205mm (8 ⁵/₆₄”) wide, 75mm (2 ⁶¹/₆₄”) deep and stands 225mm (8 ⁵⁵/₆₄”) high. ● It uses a high quality quartz clock movement to accurately keep time. ● The clock movement requires an AA battery. ● You’ll also require some readily available craft tools, wood adhesive, a plastic adhesive such as Superglue and some metallic brass spray paint. The kit contains all 92 parts required for construction; laser cut acrylic mechanical components, laser engraved legends, brass and steel fixings, wood for the base, metallic 3D printed mechanism shafts and a high quality clock movement. Also included is the beeswax wood polish, vinyl gloves, to help keep your hands free of beeswax wood polish, and abrasive paper so you can achieve a really good finish.
Assembly Instructions
In addition to your kit’s contents, you’ll require a small flat bladed screwdriver, a medium Pozidrive screwdriver, a 2mm Allen Key, a scalpel or similar craft knife, a pair of pliers, wire cutters, some masking tape, an ‘AA’ battery, some tissue or rag for cleaning and applying the polish and newspaper or similar to protect your work surface whilst painting. To glue the wooden base together, I suggest using PVA wood glue. To glue everything else together, I’d suggest using standard Superglue. If you don’t want to use Superglue, you could use an alternative as long as it sticks plastic. You’ll also need Metallic Brass Paint. I’d recommend using Plastikote Metallic Brass spray paint; other manufacturers such as Rustoleum produce similar spray paints. Health and safety PDFs can be viewed by clicking on the following links before you use the products. Refined Beeswax Polish, PVA Wood Glue and Superglue. To enable you to successfully assemble your kit, I’ve produced a series of step by step videos. Click on the links below to watch each video. I suggest watching each relevant section before starting work - then watching and pausing each step as you actually follow the instructions. Please let me know if you have any issues or suggestions to make the kit easier to construct.
You'll need a small flat bladed screwdriver, a medium Pozidrive screwdriver, a 2mm Allen Key, a scalpel or similar craft knife, a pair of pliers, wire cutters, some masking tape, an ‘AA’ battery, some tissue or rag for cleaning and applying the polish and You'll need a small flat bladed screwdriver, a medium Pozidrive screwdriver, a 2mm Allen Key, a scalpel or similar craft knife, a pair of pliers, wire cutters, some masking tape, an ‘AA’ battery, some tissue or rag for cleaning and applying the polish and You'll also need some PVA wood glue with which to glue your clock's base together. You'll also need some PVA wood glue with which to glue your clock's base together. I'd suggest using Superglue to stick the plastic parts together, although you could use an aletrnative adhesive of your choice. I'd suggest using Superglue to stick the plastic parts together, although you could use an aletrnative adhesive of your choice. You'll also need some metallic brass spray paint, that's suitable for use on plastic. I recommend Plastikote Metallic Brass. You'll also need some metallic brass spray paint, that's suitable for use on plastic. I recommend Plastikote Metallic Brass. 1. Let’s Begin 2. Making the Base 3. Assembling the Clock’s Body 4. Assembling Components 5. Painting Brass Parts 6. Panels & Mechanisms 7. Putting the Clock Together 8. Final Assembly & Calibration The Reciprocating Chronometer in all its glory! The Reciprocating Chronometer in all its glory! The Reciprocating Chronometer's hour display and AM/PM mechanism The Reciprocating Chronometer's hour display and AM/PM mechanism Fixing on the hour hand's gear spindle Fixing on the hour hand's gear spindle Putting the mechanism together Putting the mechanism together The assembled and painted parts of the Reciprocating Chronometer The assembled and painted parts of the Reciprocating Chronometer Visit The Shop Visit The Shop Assembling the clock movement housing from 10mm thick laser cut acrylic Assembling the clock movement housing from 10mm thick laser cut acrylic The snail cam follower bearing and mechanism The snail cam follower bearing and mechanism The Reciprocating Chronometer sitting on a bookcase in front of some nice William Morris wallpaper! The Reciprocating Chronometer sitting on a bookcase in front of some nice William Morris wallpaper! The complicated AM/PM indicator seen through its lens The complicated AM/PM indicator seen through its lens
The Reciprocating Chronometer Kit
This is one of my favourite inventions, as it turns the really simple and mundane task of telling the time on its head! Why have a boring circular clock when you can impress your friends and amaze your enemies with a Reciprocating Chronometer? As with all true steampunk machines, the Reciprocating Chronometer is over- complicated, employing several intriguing mechanisms to display the time on an hour dial that doesn’t go all the way around, with AM and PM being mechanically displayed through a lens. It has a beautiful polished wooden base, a brass (coloured) body and mechanisms, clear laser engraved legends, a brass chain, counterweights and even a lens and spirit level! Don’t have any doubts regarding your ability to assemble it, as it’s designed to be straightforward to put together. I’ve broken down construction into a series of easy to follow video instructions - check them out below. Alternatively they are available fully assembled. ● The Reciprocating Chronometer is 205mm (8 ⁵/₆₄”) wide, 75mm (2 ⁶¹/₆₄”) deep and stands 225mm (8 ⁵⁵/₆₄”) high. ● It uses a high quality quartz clock movement to accurately keep time. ● The clock movement requires an AA battery. ● You’ll also require some readily available craft tools, wood adhesive, a plastic adhesive such as Superglue and some metallic brass spray paint. The kit contains all 92 parts required for construction; laser cut acrylic mechanical components, laser engraved legends, brass and steel fixings, wood for the base, metallic 3D printed mechanism shafts and a high quality clock movement. Also included is the beeswax wood polish, vinyl gloves, to help keep your hands free of beeswax wood polish, and abrasive paper so you can achieve a really good finish.
Assembly Instructions
In addition to your kit’s contents, you’ll require a small flat bladed screwdriver, a medium Pozidrive screwdriver, a 2mm Allen Key, a scalpel or similar craft knife, a pair of pliers, wire cutters, some masking tape, an ‘AA’ battery, some tissue or rag for cleaning and applying the polish and newspaper or similar to protect your work surface whilst painting. To glue the wooden base together, I suggest using PVA wood glue. To glue everything else together, I’d suggest using standard Superglue. If you don’t want to use Superglue, you could use an alternative as long as it sticks plastic. You’ll also need Metallic Brass Paint. I’d recommend using Plastikote Metallic Brass spray paint; other manufacturers such as Rustoleum produce similar spray paints. Health and safety PDFs can be viewed by clicking on the following links before you use the products. Refined Beeswax Polish, PVA Wood Glue and Superglue. To enable you to successfully assemble your kit, I’ve produced a series of step by step videos. Click on the links below to watch each video. I suggest watching each relevant section before starting work - then watching and pausing each step as you actually follow the instructions. Please let me know if you have any issues or suggestions to make the kit easier to construct.
You'll need a small flat bladed screwdriver, a medium Pozidrive screwdriver, a 2mm Allen Key, a scalpel or similar craft knife, a pair of pliers, wire cutters, some masking tape, an ‘AA’ battery, some tissue or rag for cleaning and applying the polish and You'll need a small flat bladed screwdriver, a medium Pozidrive screwdriver, a 2mm Allen Key, a scalpel or similar craft knife, a pair of pliers, wire cutters, some masking tape, an ‘AA’ battery, some tissue or rag for cleaning and applying the polish and You'll also need some PVA wood glue with which to glue your clock's base together. You'll also need some PVA wood glue with which to glue your clock's base together. I'd suggest using Superglue to stick the plastic parts together, although you could use an aletrnative adhesive of your choice. I'd suggest using Superglue to stick the plastic parts together, although you could use an aletrnative adhesive of your choice. You'll also need some metallic brass spray paint, that's suitable for use on plastic. I recommend Plastikote Metallic Brass. You'll also need some metallic brass spray paint, that's suitable for use on plastic. I recommend Plastikote Metallic Brass. 1. Let’s Begin 2. Making the Base 3. Assembling the Clock’s Body 4. Assembling Components 5. Painting ‘Brass’ Parts 6. Panels & Mechanisms 7. Putting the Clock Together 8. Final Assembly & Calibration The Reciprocating Chronometer in all its glory! The Reciprocating Chronometer in all its glory! The Reciprocating Chronometer's hour display and AM/PM mechanism The Reciprocating Chronometer's hour display and AM/PM mechanism Fixing on the hour hand's gear spindle Fixing on the hour hand's gear spindle Putting the mechanism together Putting the mechanism together The assembled and painted parts of the Reciprocating Chronometer The assembled and painted parts of the Reciprocating Chronometer Assembling the clock movement housing from 10mm thick laser cut acrylic Assembling the clock movement housing from 10mm thick laser cut acrylic The mechanical AM/PM indicator seen through its lens The mechanical AM/PM indicator seen through its lens The Reciprocating Chronometer sitting on a bookcase in front of some nice William Morris wallpaper! The Reciprocating Chronometer sitting on a bookcase in front of some nice William Morris wallpaper! Visit The Shop Visit The Shop